August 30, 2015

1939: Giants Use 3 Field Goals to Defeat College All-Stars


The New York Giants represented the NFL in the sixth installment of the College All-Star Game in Chicago on August 30, 1939. They faced an All-Star squad coached by Elmer Layden, head coach of Notre Dame and a former member of that school’s famed “Four Horsemen” backfield.

The Giants were coached by Steve Owen, who had guided the club to two NFL Championships in eight years, including the 1938 season. New York had an able passer in tailback Ed Danowski and could run the ball effectively, most notably with FB Tuffy Leemans carrying. C/LB Mel Hein was coming off of a season in which he had been named MVP by the league and the team allowed few points on defense. Returning to the club was Ken Strong (pictured above), a former star fullback and placekicker who had jumped leagues after the 1935 season but was back at age 33.

The All-Stars had won the previous two contests and this year’s roster included future pro stars in center Charley Brock from Nebraska, Pitt HB Marshall Goldberg, FB Bill Osmanski of Holy Cross, and the diminutive Heisman-winning QB Davey O’Brien from TCU.  

There were 81,456 fans in attendance for the Wednesday night game at Soldier Field. The All-Stars were in trouble early when Davey O’Brien fumbled the game’s first punt and end Jim Poole recovered for New York. However, the Giants were unable to capitalize when Ward Cuff missed a field goal from 41 yards by inches.

Following an exchange of punts, the Giants again moved into scoring territory thanks to good runs by FB John “Bull” Karcis and Cuff. Cuff kicked a 34-yard field goal late in the first quarter to put the Giants in front.

In the second quarter, New York put together a 56-yard series that led to another field goal, this time by Ken Strong from 22 yards, to take a 6-0 advantage. The All-Stars responded by driving from their 28 to the New York 39, with the big play a 15-yard run by Bill Osmanski. However, a second-down pass by Michigan State back Johnny Pingel was intercepted by LB Kayo Lunday to end the threat.

The Giants attempted to add to their advantage in the third quarter with a drive to the All-Star 13, but came up empty when O’Brien intercepted a pass. The pro champs mounted another strong possession to the All-Star two, but Cuff’s try for a field goal hit the upright and bounced away.

Following more punts which included a quick-kick by the Giants that pinned the All-Stars back at their 20, New York got another field goal, again by Strong, who connected from 41 yards.

The All-Stars finally mounted a threat in the fourth quarter with Baylor QB Bill Patterson in the game, who threw the ball effectively. But drives to the New York 11 and 17 were blunted by interceptions by DB Len Barnum and LB Doug Oldershaw, respectively. The Giants came away with a 9-0 win in which they were more dominant than the score indicated.



The Giants, who controlled the line of scrimmage and kept the collegians bottled up on their side of the field for most of the game, had the edge in total yards (199 to 166) although the All-Stars had more first downs (10 to 9). However, New York intercepted five passes. Bill Osmanski (pictured at left) and QB George Faust from Minnesota drew praise as the best of the All-Star rushers.

The win for the Giants tied the series, which was far more competitive at that point than it would be in the ensuing years of its existence, at two wins apiece, with two ties.  New York again topped the Eastern Division with a 9-1-1 record during the regular season but lost in a title rematch with the Green Bay Packers.

Bill Osmanski played seven years in the NFL with the Chicago Bears and led the league in rushing as a rookie in 1939. Davey O’Brien also had a fine first year with the Philadelphia Eagles, passing for a NFL-high 1324 yards in his first of two pro seasons before leaving to join the FBI.

August 29, 2015

Highlighted Year: Bob Davis, 1974

Quarterback, Florida Blazers


Age: 29 (Sept. 15)
8th season in pro football, 1st in WFL & with Blazers
College: Virginia
Height: 6’2”   Weight: 202

Prelude:
Davis was a quarterback who could both run and pass effectively in college, throwing for 3095 yards and gaining 930 on the ground, but he suffered a major knee injury in his last game. He was chosen by the Houston Oilers in the second round of the 1967 NFL/AFL draft and he was a backup in Houston for three seasons, completing 67 of 147 passes (45.6 %) for 735 yards and two TDs with 12 interceptions. Davis spent the 1970 to ’73 seasons with the New York Jets and started seven games in 1971 due to injuries to Joe Namath and Al Woodall. It proved to be his most productive NFL season as he threw for 624 yards and 10 touchdowns, but he averaged just 5.2 yards per attempt and completed only 40.5 percent of his passes. Davis spent a year as a backup with New Orleans in 1973 and saw scant action. He was traded to Buffalo but signed with the Washington Ambassadors of the new WFL for ’74. By the time the regular season started, the club was in Orlando and called the Florida Blazers.

1974 Season Summary
Appeared in all 20 games
[Bracketed numbers indicate league rank in Top 20]

Passing
Attempts – 414 [3]
Completions – 227 [3]
Yards – 3079 [3]
Completion percentage – 54.8 [1]
Yards per attempt – 7.4 [3]
TD passes – 21 [5]
Interceptions – 23 [2]

Rushing
Attempts – 28
Yards – 94
Average gain – 3.4
TDs – 2

Scoring
TDs – 2
Action Points - 0
Points – 14
(Note: Touchdowns counted for 7 points in the WFL)

Postseason: 3 G
Pass attempts – 50
Most pass attempts, game – 21 at Birmingham, WFL Championship
Pass completions – 17
Most pass completions, game – 8 at Birmingham, WFL Championship
Passing yardage – 317
Most passing yards, game – 184 at Birmingham, WFL Championship
TD passes – 3
Most TD passes, game – 2 at Birmingham, WFL Championship
Interceptions – 2
Most interceptions, game – 2 at Birmingham, WFL Championship

Rushing attempts – 3
Most rushing attempts, game – 3 at Birmingham, WFL Championship
Rushing yards – 10
Most rushing yards, game – 10 at Birmingham, WFL Championship
Average gain rushing – 3.3
Rushing TDs – 0

Blazers went 14-6 to finish first in the WFL Eastern Division. Won First Round playoff over Philadelphia Bell (18-3) & Second Round playoff over Memphis Southmen (18-15). Lost WFL Championship to Birmingham Americans (22-21). 

Aftermath:
Following the demise of the Blazers, Davis joined the Philadelphia Bell in 1975 and beat out Jim “King” Corcoran to be the starting quarterback. He passed for 1114 yards and 7 touchdowns while giving up 12 interceptions before the league folded at midseason, ending his career as well. Davis ended up as the WFL’s career passing yardage leader in its brief existence with 4193 yards, tossing 28 TD passes with 35 interceptions. In the NFL, he started a total of 14 games and threw for 1553 yards and 14 TDs while giving up 23 interceptions.

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Highlighted Years features players who were consensus first-team All-League* selections or league* or conference** leaders in the following statistical categories:

Rushing: Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Passing: Yards, Completion Pct., Yards per Attempt, TDs, Rating
Receiving: Catches, Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Scoring: TDs, Points, Field Goals (min. 5)
All-Purpose: Total Yards
Defense: Interceptions, Sacks
Kickoff Returns: Average
Punt Returns: Average
Punting: Average

*Leagues include NFL (1920 to date), AFL (1926), AFL (1936-37), AAFC (1946-49), AFL (1960-69), WFL (1974-75), USFL (1983-85)

**NFC/AFC since 1970

August 27, 2015

Highlighted Year: Billy Hillenbrand, 1948

Halfback, Baltimore Colts


Age: 26
3rd season in pro football, 2nd with Colts
College: Indiana
Height: 6’0”   Weight: 188

Prelude:
Hillenbrand was a consensus first-team All-American in 1942 and was chosen by the New York Giants in the first round of the 1944 NFL draft. However, he went into the military for two years during World War II and played service football. The versatile halfback signed with the Chicago Rockets of the new AAFC in 1946 and had a good year for a poor team, gaining 490 yards from scrimmage, intercepting three passes on defense, and returning both a punt and kickoff for touchdowns. He moved on to the Colts in 1948 and further developed as a receiver out of the backfield, catching 39 passes for 702 yards (18.0 avg.) and seven TDs and, adding in kick returns, he gained 1573 all-purpose yards.

1948 Season Summary
Appeared in all 14 games
[Bracketed numbers indicate league rank in Top 20]

Rushing
Attempts – 100 [10, tied with Edgar Jones]
Yards – 510 [12]
Most yards, game – 112 yards (on 12 carries) at Brooklyn 11/28
Average gain – 5.1 [9]
TDs – 7 [5, tied with Lou Tomasetti]

Pass Receiving
Receptions – 50 [3, tied with Fay King]
Yards – 970 [1]
Average gain – 19.4 [2]
TDs – 6 [8, tied with Jack Russell]

Kickoff Returns
Returns – 16 [4]
Yards – 356 [5]
Average per return – 22.3 [4]
TDs – 0
Longest return – N/A

Punt Returns
Returns – 18 [4]
Yards – 231 [6]
Average per return – 12.8 [5]
TDs – 0
Longest return – N/A

All-Purpose yards – 2067 [2]

Scoring
TDs – 13 [3]
Points – 78 [4]

Postseason: 1 G (Eastern Division playoff vs. Buffalo)
Rushing attempts – 6
Rushing yards – 5
Average gain rushing – 0.8
Rushing TDs – 0

Pass receptions – 7
Receiving yards – 75
Average yards per reception – 10.7
Pass receiving TDs – 0

Kickoff returns – 3
Kickoff return yards – 35
Average yards per return – 11.7
Kickoff return TDs – 0

Punt returns – 1
Punt return yards – 0
Punt return TDs – 0

Awards & Honors:
2nd team All-AAFC: League, UPI, NY Daily News

Colts went 7-7 to tie for first in the AAFC Eastern Division while leading the league in passing yards (2899). Lost Eastern Division playoff to Buffalo Bills (28-17).

Aftermath:
Hillenbrand’s outstanding 1948 season turned out to be his last. He retired, having caught 110 passes for 1987 yards (18.1 avg.) and 17 touchdowns, rushed for 889 yards on 216 carries (4.1 avg.) and another 11 TDs, returned 44 punts for a 13.9 average and a TD and 42 kickoffs for a 24.8-yard average and two scores. Overall, he scored 31 touchdowns in his three seasons.

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Highlighted Years features players who were consensus first-team All-League* selections or league* or conference** leaders in the following statistical categories:

Rushing: Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Passing: Yards, Completion Pct., Yards per Attempt, TDs, Rating
Receiving: Catches, Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Scoring: TDs, Points, Field Goals (min. 5)
All-Purpose: Total Yards
Defense: Interceptions, Sacks
Kickoff Returns: Average
Punt Returns: Average
Punting: Average

*Leagues include NFL (1920 to date), AFL (1926), AFL (1936-37), AAFC (1946-49), AFL (1960-69), WFL (1974-75), USFL (1983-85)

**NFC/AFC since 1970

August 25, 2015

1943: College All-Stars Thrash Redskins in Game at Northwestern


The tenth College All-Star Game was held on August 25, 1943 and was the first to be played at a venue other than Soldier Field in Chicago. The Wednesday night contest was held instead in nearby Evanston at Dyche Stadium of Northwestern University with 48,471 fans in attendance.

The NFL Champions, the Washington Redskins, were heavy favorites coming into the game. They had a new head coach in Dutch Bergman but capable returning veterans in tailback Sammy Baugh, HB Wilbur Moore, FB Bob Seymour, end Bob Masterson, and tackle Willie Wilkin.

Harry Stuhldreher, former member of Notre Dame’s “Four Horsemen” backfield and now head coach at Wisconsin, coached the All-Stars and prepared them well, running a simple but effective offense. The team was chosen by coaches rather than a nationwide newspaper poll, as in past years, and included future pro stars in Indiana end Pete Pihos, tackle Al Wistert of Michigan, Stanford center Vic Lindskog, Northwestern tailback Otto Graham, HB Charley Trippi of Georgia, and FB Pat Harder from Wisconsin (pictured above).

There was a heavy rain as the game started and it was hot and muggy for the remainder of the contest, which seemed to wear the Redskins down more than the collegians. The Redskins had first possession and drove from their 35 to the All-Star 38 in seven plays before being stopped and coming up empty.

The next Washington series ended with a punt by Sammy Baugh from his own 21 and HB Bob Steuber from Missouri picked up the bouncing ball and returned it 50 yards behind outstanding blocking for the first touchdown of the game. Pat Harder added the extra point.

The All-Stars got another break when Bob Seymour fumbled and Al Wistert recovered at the Washington 48. But after advancing 20 yards in four plays, highlighted by an Otto Graham pass to Pete Pihos for 12 yards, Harder fumbled and end Bob Masterson recovered for the Redskins to end the threat.

Washington then put together a 70-yard drive that stretched into the second quarter. Baugh completed two passes for first downs along the way and ended the series with a touchdown pass to end Joe Aguirre that covered six yards. Masterson kicked the extra point to tie the score. It would prove to be the high point for the pro champs.

Late in the second quarter, the All-Stars scored again. A penalty on a Washington punt gave the collegians good starting field position at their 42 and, with Tulsa’s passing tailback Glenn Dobbs now in the game, they went to the air. Dobbs was sacked on first down but completed five passes, including one to Washington State back Bob Kennedy for 19 yards and another to Harder for 14. The last was also to Harder, a short toss that ended up covering 36 yards for a TD. Harder again added the point after and the All-Stars took a 14-7 lead into halftime.



In the third quarter, the Redskins advanced to the All-Star 17, but a second down pass intended for Bob Seymour in the end zone was instead intercepted by Otto Graham (pictured at left), who made a spectacular play with a 97-yard interception return for another touchdown. Harder failed to add the PAT, but the rejuvenated All-Stars were ahead by 20-7.

Washington would never seriously threaten again.  In the fourth quarter, Harder scored a second TD on a 30-yard run to put the game away. Graham kicked the extra point and the All-Stars won in convincing fashion by a final score of 27-7.

Washington had the edge in total yards (325 to 212), with 273 of that total coming through the air, and first downs (16 to 9). However, the Redskins turned the ball over five times, three of them by interception, to two suffered by the collegians.

Pat Harder led the All-Stars in rushing with 53 yards on 12 carries and scored two touchdowns, and also played well at linebacker on defense. Sammy Baugh completed 21 of 41 passes for Washington.

It was the first win for the All-Stars since 1938, also over the Redskins, and the third since the series began in 1934 (there had been two ties). Washington went on to top the Eastern Division for the third time in four years but lost the NFL Championship game to the Bears.

Pat Harder and Otto Graham both appeared in the 1946 College All-Star Game (during World War II restrictions on participation were lifted, which allowed underclassmen to appear, and several players played in multiple games). They moved on to successful pro careers, and both would return to the College All-Star Game as members of NFL Championship clubs (Harder with the Cardinals and Lions, Graham with the Browns). Graham would later coach the All-Stars for ten games of the series that lasted until 1976, two of which they won.

August 23, 2015

Highlighted Year: Johnny Budd, 1926

Guard/Tackle, Frankford Yellow Jackets



Age: 27
1st season in pro football
College: Lafayette
Height: 5’11” Weight: 246

Prelude:
A latecomer to college, Budd starred with outstanding Lafayette College football teams that went a combined 14-3-1 in his junior and senior seasons. He signed with the Yellow Jackets and played right tackle while splitting the placekicking with Hap Moran.

1926 Season Summary
Appeared in all 17 games
[Bracketed numbers indicate league rank in Top 20]

Scoring
Field Goals – 6 [4]
PATs – 12 [5]
Points – 30 [13, tied with Jim Welsh]

Awards & Honors:
1st team All-NFL: Chicago Tribune, Green Bay Press-Gazette

Yellow Jackets went 14-1-2 to finish first in the NFL while leading the league in scoring (236 points) and touchdowns (28).

Aftermath:
Budd played with the Pottsville Maroons in 1927 and ’28 and went on to perform with independent pro teams, most notably the Millville Big Blue, that sometimes played non-league contests against NFL clubs. Overall in the NFL, he appeared in a total of 40 games and scored 33 points on six field goals and 15 extra points.

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Highlighted Years features players who were consensus first-team All-League* selections or league* or conference** leaders in the following statistical categories:

Rushing: Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Passing: Yards, Completion Pct., Yards per Attempt, TDs, Rating
Receiving: Catches, Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Scoring: TDs, Points, Field Goals (min. 5)
All-Purpose: Total Yards
Defense: Interceptions, Sacks
Kickoff Returns: Average
Punt Returns: Average
Punting: Average

*Leagues include NFL (1920 to date), AFL (1926), AFL (1936-37), AAFC (1946-49), AFL (1960-69), WFL (1974-75), USFL (1983-85)

**NFC/AFC since 1970

August 21, 2015

1974: Emery’s Third TD Propels Sun Past Bell


Two World Football League teams with 3-3 records met in Philadelphia on August 21, 1974. The visiting Southern California Sun were in first place in the Western Division, just ahead of the Houston Texans, while the host Philadelphia Bell were third in the Eastern Division and trying to keep pace with the Florida Blazers and New York Stars.

The Sun, coached by Tom Fears, had an all-rookie starting backfield of QB Tony Adams, FB James McAlister, and HB Kermit Johnson. Adams was playing well, but while Johnson ranked second in the league with 407 rushing yards, he had been injured the previous week and was unavailable for the game against the Bell.

Philadelphia had taken heat for inflating early home attendance figures with free and heavily-discounted tickets and the local media was thus making far more of missteps by the front office than the team’s play on the field. With Head Coach Ron Waller utilizing a creative offense, eccentric QB Jim “King” Corcoran had passed for 1168 yards and 12 touchdowns in six games and the running  back combination of John Land and Claude Watts was a productive one.

There were 14,600 fans in attendance at JFK Stadium on a pleasant Wednesday night. The Bell broke out to the early lead in the first quarter when RB John Land caught a pass from “King” Corcoran for a nine-yard touchdown. Corcoran tossed another TD pass later in the opening period, this time connecting with WR Paul Dunn from 34 yards out. In both instances the action point attempts failed and the score was 14-0 (in the WFL, touchdowns counted for seven points and were followed by an action point attempt that could not be kicked).

The Sun got on the board when RB Alonzo Emery (pictured at top) ran for a one-yard touchdown and the tally was 14-8 after Tony Adams threw to James McAlister for the action point. In the second quarter, the visitors took the lead when Emery again scored from a yard out and Adams successfully ran for the action point and a 16-14 margin.

Philadelphia moved back in front at 21-16 on a one-yard TD carry by RB Alan Thompson, but the pass attempt for the action point was unsuccessful. Before the half was over, Adams threw to WR Dave Williams for an 11-yard touchdown and RB Ralph Nelson ran for the action point. The Sun took a 24-21 lead into halftime.

In the third quarter, Corcoran again rallied the Bell on a series highlighted by two passes to TE Mike Carter, one of 12 yards and the next for a 27-yard TD. They failed once more at adding the action point, but led by 28-24.

The game had been highlighted by passing and long kick returns during the first three quarters, but the teams slugged it out in the final period. The Southern California offense remained stymied until late in the contest when they advanced 80 yards in 11 plays, helped along by two 15-yard penalties called on the defense. Adams threw to WR Greg Moses for a 29-yard gain to the Philadelphia one and, with 52 seconds remaining, Alonzo Emery scored his third touchdown to move the Sun back in front.

The attempt to add the action point was unsuccessful and so there was still an opportunity for Philadelphia, down by three points, to tie the score. A sweep by Land put the Bell at the Southern California 40 and Land then caught a pass from Corcoran at the 31. However, an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty moved the ball back 15 yards (and drew the furor of Coach Waller) and, while two sideline passes moved the ball into field goal range, a 36-yard field goal attempt by Jerry Warren was blocked. Southern California came away with a dramatic 31-28 win.

The Sun had the edge in total yards (430 to 399) and first downs (23 to 17). Philadelphia turned the ball over four times, to one suffered by Southern California, and drew 11 penalties to five flags thrown on the Sun, although Ron Waller blamed “jaded officiating” for several of the infractions called on his team.

Tony Adams completed 21 of 40 passes for 318 yards and a touchdown while giving up no interceptions. Ralph Nelson rushed for 49 yards on 17 carries and James McAlister (pictured below) added 35 yards on six attempts, while Alonzo Emery scored the three short TDs as part of his 9 yards on 7 carries. McAlister also led the receivers with 6 catches for 140 yards.



For the Bell, Jim Corcoran was successful on 18 of 33 throws for 241 yards and three TDs, although he was picked off twice. John Land ran for 51 yards on 10 attempts and Claude Watts carried 11 times for 44 yards. Claude Watts topped the receivers with 5 catches for 50 yards while Paul Dunn and Mike Carter had four pass receptions apiece, for 79 and 71 yards, respectively. CB Marv Pettaway had kickoff returns of 73 and 47 yards that set up scores.

The Sun moved a game over .500 and Philadelphia a game under. Southern California pulled away to top the Western Division with a 13-7 record and the Bell went 9-11 to place third in the Eastern Division. Both teams made it into the constantly-revamped playoffs and lost in the first round.

Alonzo Emery scored a total of seven touchdowns. Utilized in short-yardage situations, he ran for just 67 yards on 40 carries in his only pro season. 

August 20, 2015

Highlighted Year: Steve Bagarus, 1945

Halfback, Washington Redskins


Age: 26
5th season in pro football, 1st in NFL & with Redskins
College: Notre Dame
Height: 6’0”   Weight: 170

Prelude:
Recipient of a basketball scholarship to attend Notre Dame, Bagarus had his biggest football moment when he returned an interception for a touchdown in a 14-0 win over Army in 1939. He went into the military during World War II and also played for the San Diego Bombers of the Pacific Coast Football League from 1941 to ‘44. He led the league in touchdowns three times and scoring twice, with highs of 12 TDs and 72 points in 1943. Bagarus joined the Redskins in 1945 and proved to be an outstanding receiver out of the backfield as well as an excellent open-field runner.

1945 Season Summary
Appeared in all 10 games
[Bracketed numbers indicate league rank in Top 20]

Rushing
Attempts – 39
Yards – 154
Average gain – 3.9
TDs – 1

Pass Receiving
Receptions – 34 [3]
Yards – 617 [3]
Most yards, game – 162 (on 8 catches) at NY Giants 10/28
Average gain – 18.1 [7]
TDs – 5 [6, tied with John Greene]

Kickoff Returns
Returns – 12 [4]
Yards – 325 [3]
Average per return – 27.1 [2]
TDs – 0
Longest return – 55 yards

Punt Returns
Returns – 21 [1]
Yards – 251 [1]
Average per return – 12.0 [4]
TDs – 0
Longest return – 28 yards

All-Purpose yards – 1347 [2]

Scoring
TDs – 6 [9, tied with Frank Akins, Ken Kavanaugh & Pug Manders]
Points – 36 [13, tied with Frank Akins, Ken Kavanaugh & Pug Manders]

Postseason: 1 G (NFL Championship at Cleveland)
Rushing attempts – 5
Rushing yards – -4
Average gain rushing – -0.8
Rushing TDs – 0

Pass receptions – 3
Receiving yards – 95
Average yards per reception – 31.7
Pass receiving TDs – 1

Kickoff returns – 1
Kickoff return yards – 29
Average yards per return – 29.0
Kickoff return TDs – 0

Punt returns – 4
Punt return yards – 52
Average yards per return – 13.0
Punt return TDs – 0

Awards & Honors:
1st team All-NFL: AP
2nd team All-NFL: Chicago Herald-American, NY Daily News

Redskins went 8-2 to finish first in the NFL Eastern Division while leading the league in total yards (3546). Lost NFL Championship to Cleveland Rams (15-14).

Aftermath:
Bagarus gained 771 yards from scrimmage in 1946 and also averaged 10.7 yards on 18 punt returns and 25.5 yards returning 13 kickoffs. He was traded to the Rams in 1947 and broke his leg, sidelining him for most of the season. Waived early in ’48, the Redskins re-signed him for the last five games. He caught 15 passes for 100 yards and a TD and retired, although he did see action with Wilmington and Richmond of the minor league AFL in 1949. Overall in the NFL, Bagarus had 80 pass receptions for 1155 yards (14.4 avg.), ran the ball 98 times for 343 yards (3.5 avg.), returned 41 punts for an 11.2-yard average and 27 kickoffs for an average of 25.3 yards. He also intercepted five passes on defense and scored a total of 10 touchdowns.  

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Highlighted Years features players who were first-team All-League* selections or league* or conference** leaders in the following statistical categories:

Rushing: Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Passing: Yards, Completion Pct., Yards per Attempt, TDs, Rating
Receiving: Catches, Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Scoring: TDs, Points, Field Goals (min. 5)
All-Purpose: Total Yards
Defense: Interceptions, Sacks
Kickoff Returns: Average
Punt Returns: Average
Punting: Average

*Leagues include NFL (1920 to date), AFL (1926), AFL (1936-37), AAFC (1946-49), AFL (1960-69), WFL (1974-75), USFL (1983-85)

**NFC/AFC since 1970