June 24, 2016

Highlighted Year: Terrell Davis, 1997

Running Back, Denver Broncos


Age: 25 (Oct. 28)
3rd season in pro football & with Broncos
College: Georgia
Height: 5’11” Weight: 200

Prelude:
Unheralded coming out of college, Davis was taken by the Broncos in the sixth round of the 1995 NFL draft and emerged to rush for 1117 yards and catch 49 passes. In 1996 he ran for 1538 yards to lead the AFC and was named NFL Offensive Player of the Year by the Associated Press as well as being a consensus first-team All-Pro and selected to the Pro Bowl.

1997 Season Summary
Appeared and started in 15 of 16 games
[Bracketed numbers indicate league rank in Top 20]

Rushing
Attempts – 369 [2]
Most attempts, game – 42 (for 207 yds.) at Buffalo 10/26
Yards – 1750 [2, 1st in AFC]
Most yards, game – 215 yards (on 27 carries) vs. Cincinnati 9/21
Average gain – 4.7 [7]
TDs – 15 [1, tied with Karim Abdul-Jabbar]
200-yard rushing games – 2
100-yard rushing games – 10

Pass Receiving
Receptions – 42      
Most receptions, game – 7 (for 70 yds.) at Oakland 10/19
Yards – 287
Most yards, game – 70 (on 7 catches) at Oakland 10/19
Average gain – 6.8
TDs – 0

All-purpose yards – 2030 [4, 1st in AFC]

Scoring
TDs – 15 [2]
2-pt conversions – 3 [1, tied with Cris Carter]
Points – 96 [20, tied with Karim Abdul-Jabbar]

Postseason: 4 G
Rushing attempts – 112
Most rushing attempts, game – 31 vs. Jacksonville, AFC Wild Card playoff
Rushing yards – 581
Most rushing yards, game – 184 vs. Jacksonville, AFC Wild Card playoff
Average gain rushing – 5.2
Rushing TDs – 8
100-yard rushing games – 4

Pass receptions – 8
Most pass receptions, game – 4 vs. Jacksonville, AFC Wild Card playoff
Pass receiving yards – 38
Most pass receiving yards, game – 17 at Kansas City, AFC Divisional playoff
Average yards per reception – 4.8
Pass Receiving TDs – 0

Awards & Honors:
1st team All-NFL: AP, PFWA, Sporting News
1st team All-AFC: Pro Football Weekly
Pro Bowl

Broncos went 12-4 to finish second in the AFC West and qualified for the postseason as a Wild Card while leading the NFL in total yards (5872), touchdowns (55), and scoring (472 points). Won AFC Wild Card playoff over Jacksonville Jaguars (42-17), AFC Divisional playoff over Kansas City Chiefs (14-10), AFC Championship over Pittsburgh Steelers (24-21) & Super Bowl over Green Bay Packers (31-24).

Aftermath:
Davis rushed for 2008 yards and 21 touchdowns in 1998 and received consensus league MVP honors while the Broncos repeated as NFL Champions. But after rushing for 6413 yards in four years, Davis gained just 211 yards on the ground in ‘99 as he sustained a major knee injury in the fourth game. Returning in 2000, he struggled, appearing in only five contests and rushing for 282 yards. Davis ran for 701 yards in one last injury-riddled season in 2001. For his career, he gained 7607 yards on 1655 carries and added another 1280 yards on 169 pass receptions. Davis was a consensus first-team All-NFL selection three times and was selected to as many Pro Bowls in his short but productive career.

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Highlighted Years features players who were first-team All-League* selections or league* or conference** leaders in the following statistical categories:

Rushing: Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Passing: Yards, Completion Pct., Yards per Attempt, TDs, Rating
Receiving: Catches, Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Scoring: TDs, Points, Field Goals (min. 5)
All-Purpose: Total Yards
Defense: Interceptions, Sacks
Kickoff Returns: Average
Punt Returns: Average
Punting: Average

*Leagues include NFL (1920 to date), AFL (1926), AFL (1936-37), AAFC (1946-49), AFL (1960-69), WFL (1974-75), USFL (1983-85)

**NFC/AFC since 1970

June 22, 2016

Highlighted Year: Toni Fritsch, 1975

Placekicker, Dallas Cowboys





Age: 30
5th season in pro football (4th active) & with Cowboys
College: None
Height: 5’7”   Weight: 195

Prelude:
Fritsch starred at soccer in his native Austria, playing for the Rapid Vienna club plus the Austrian national team. Discovered by Cowboys scouts who were touring Europe in search of soccer-style kickers, Fritsch signed a free agent contract and moved to the US. He started the 1971 season on the taxi squad but was activated at midseason, and while he kicked a game-winning field goal in his NFL debut, a subsequent pulled hamstring had him sharing the kicking duties with Mike Clark. The gregarious Fritsch followed up in ’72 by connecting on 21 of 36 field goal attempts and all 36 of his tries for extra points and in 1973 he led the league as he made good on all 43 PAT attempts and was successful on 18 of 28 field goals. Fritsch missed the entire 1974 season due to a knee injury but returned in ’75 and reclaimed his job.

1975 Season Summary
Appeared in all 14 games
[Bracketed numbers indicate league rank in Top 20]

Kicking
Field goals – 22 [1, tied with Jan Stenerud]
Most field goals, game – 4 vs. LA Rams 9/21
Field goal attempts – 35 [1]
Most field goal attempts, game – 6 vs. LA Rams 9/21
Field goal percentage – 62.9 [13]
PATs – 38 [9]
PAT attempts – 40 [9]
Longest field goal – 43 yards at New England 11/16

Scoring
Field Goals – 22
PATs – 38
Points – 104 [3]

Postseason: 3 G
Field goals – 5
Most field goals, game – 3 at LA Rams, NFC Championship
Field goal attempts – 6
Most field goal attempts, game – 3 at LA Rams, NFC Championship
PATs – 8
Most PATs, game – 4 at LA Rams, NFC Championship
PAT attempts – 8
Longest field goal – 40 yards at LA Rams, NFC Championship

Awards & Honors:
2nd team All-NFC: UPI

Cowboys went 10-4 to finish second in the NFC East and qualified as a Wild Card for the postseason while leading the conference in rushing yards (2432) and total yards (5025). Won NFC Divisional playoff over Minnesota Vikings (17-14) & NFC Championship over Los Angeles Rams (37-7). Lost Super Bowl to Pittsburgh Steelers (21-17).  

Aftermath:
Following an inconsistent preseason in 1976, Fritsch was traded to San Diego and lasted for five games before being released. He joined the Houston Oilers just prior to the ’77 season and bounced back with 12 field goals in 16 tries, good for a NFL-leading 75.0 %. Fritsch spent five seasons with the Oilers and twice more led the league in field goal percentage while also garnering consensus first-team All-NFL and Pro Bowl honors in 1979. Beaten out by Florian Kempf in the 1982 preseason, he joined the New Orleans Saints, where he was reunited with ex-Houston coach Bum Phillips, and retired following the season. However, he returned to pro football with the Houston Gamblers of the USFL in 1984 and topped the circuit in field goal percentage in both ’84 (80.8) and ’85 (87.5), his last two pro seasons. In the NFL, Fritsch was good on 157 of 231 field goal attempts (68.0%) and, adding 287 PATs, scored 758 points. Of those totals, 66 field goals out of 107 tries and 119 PATs, for a total of 317 points, came with the Cowboys. In the postseason, he booted 20 field goals in 25 tries, setting a NFL record by kicking at least one in 13 straight playoff games, and made good on all 26 of his PATs. In the USFL, he was successful on 42 of 50 field goals and added 126 extra points for 252 total points. Fritsch was a first-team All-NFL choice once, received second-team honors after one other season, and was selected to one Pro Bowl. He also received first-team All-USFL recognition in 1984.

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Highlighted Years features players who were consensus first-team All-League* selections or league* or conference** leaders in the following statistical categories:

Rushing: Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Passing: Yards, Completion Pct., Yards per Attempt, TDs, Rating
Receiving: Catches, Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Scoring: TDs, Points, Field Goals (min. 5)
All-Purpose: Total Yards
Defense: Interceptions, Sacks
Kickoff Returns: Average
Punt Returns: Average
Punting: Average

*Leagues include NFL (1920 to date), AFL (1926), AFL (1936-37), AAFC (1946-49), AFL (1960-69), WFL (1974-75), USFL (1983-85)

**NFC/AFC since 1970

June 20, 2016

1983: Last-Minute Field Goal Propels Panthers Past Federals


The Michigan Panthers were fighting for a playoff spot in the inaugural United States Football League season as they hosted the Washington Federals on June 20, 1983. The Federals had defeated Michigan early in the season, but the Panthers had undergone changes that improved their fortunes since then.

Coached by Jim Stanley, Michigan got off to a 1-4 start (including the loss at Washington) before veteran additions to the offensive line helped fuel a turnaround that had the club at 9-6 and a game behind Chicago and Tampa Bay in the USFL’s Central Division. Unheralded rookie QB Bobby Hebert was fast developing into a star and WR Anthony Carter (pictured above), the high-priced first year player out of Michigan, had overcome a slow start to become a potent deep threat. The running game was sound and the defense formidable.

The Federals, under Head Coach Ray Jauch, were far less successful and had won only one other contest thus far to linger at the bottom of the Atlantic Division with a league-worst 2-13 record. There was an outstanding rookie in RB Craig James and first-year QB Mike Hohensee was able when healthy, but he was out for the rematch with the Panthers and veteran NFL backup Kim McQuilken was filling in. 

There were 26,418 fans in attendance for the Monday night game at the Pontiac Silverdome. Early in the first quarter, the Panthers advanced into Washington territory and Bobby Hebert threw to Anthony Carter, who split two defenders on the way to a 37-yard touchdown. Novo Bojovic added the extra point.

On their next possession, the Panthers again moved well. Hebert completed passes to Carter for 20 and 10 yards, but after gaining a first down inside the Washington 10, the Federals were able to keep them out of the end zone thanks to good plays by LB Joe Harris and CB Jeff Brown. Michigan had to settle for a 19-yard Bojovic field goal.

Down 10-0, the Federals put together a good drive. McQuilken tossed passes to WR Mike Harris, Craig James, and RB Billy Taylor and, facing third-and-one at the Michigan four, he faked a handoff and threw to a wide-open Taylor in the end zone for a TD. Sandro Vitiello missed the point after but the score was narrowed to 10-6.

Washington’s next series resulted in a punt from deep in its own territory. DE Ronnie Paggett partially blocked the kick and Carter returned it to the Federals’ 14. A pass interference call and throw from Hebert to Carter that covered 10 yards set up a one-yard touchdown carry by RB John Williams. Bojovic converted and the Panthers were ahead by 17-6 with 1:12 remaining in the half. The second quarter scoring was not yet over, however, as the Federals were able to get past midfield and, on the final play before halftime, Vitiello booted a field goal from 51 yards that made it 17-9.

Early in the third quarter, Washington got a break on defense when TE Mike Cobb fumbled after catching a pass from Hebert and SS Doug Greene recovered the loose ball and ran 35 unmolested yards for a TD. A try for a two-point conversion that would have tied the score failed, but Michigan’s lead was narrowed to 17-15.

The Federals pulled off a successful onside kick but turned the ball over on a Taylor fumble three plays later. Michigan took advantage, driving to a one-yard run for a TD by RB Ken Lacy, and Bojovic added the extra point. Washington responded with a 74-yard possession that featured the running of James and RB Curtis Bledsoe and resulted in a one-yard scoring carry by James with 6:48 to go in the period. This time Vitiello made good on the point after to again make it a two-point contest at 24-22.

That was it for the scoring until the fourth quarter when Vitiello came through on a 45-yard field goal that gave the visitors a narrow 25-24 advantage. But with their backs to the wall, the Panthers put together a 73-yard drive. With 18 seconds left on the clock, Bojovic kicked an 18-yard field goal that provided the final margin in Michigan’s 27-25 win.

The Panthers led in total yards (335 to 285) while Washington had the edge in first downs (17 to 16) and time of possession (31:13 to 28:47). Each team turned the ball over twice while Michigan recorded four sacks, to none by the Federals.

Bobby Hebert completed 13 of 21 passes for 195 yards and a touchdown as well as an interception. Anthony Carter had 5 catches for 94 yards and a TD. Ken Lacy rushed for 81 yards on 22 carries that included a touchdown and John Williams added 59 yards on 16 attempts that also included a score.


For the Federals, Kim McQuilken was successful on 19 of 27 throws for 158 yards and a TD without giving up an interception. Craig James (pictured above) gained 89 yards on 13 rushing attempts and also had 7 pass receptions for 63 yards.

The win kept the Panthers even with the Bandits, who lost, and they ultimately finished atop the Central Division at 12-6 (Chicago ended up with the lone Wild Card spot and Tampa Bay finished third and missed the postseason). Michigan handily defeated the Oakland Invaders in the Semifinal playoff round and then edged the Philadelphia Stars to win the initial USFL Championship. The hard-luck Federals managed to win twice more and were 4-14.

June 18, 2016

Highlighted Year: Horace Gillom, 1951

End/Punter, Cleveland Browns


Age: 30
5th season in pro football & with Browns
College: Nevada-Reno
Height: 6’1”   Weight: 220

Prelude:
Gillom starred at Massillon, Ohio’s Washington High School under Head Coach Paul Brown and followed his coach to Ohio State in 1941, but left to go into the army during World War II. Gillom enrolled at Nevada after his discharge in 1946 and joined the Browns of the AAFC in ‘47, reuniting with Coach Brown. He backed up at end on both offense and defense and made his biggest mark as a punter. Gillom‘s high, booming kicks were noted for their hang time, and he lined up 15 yards behind center, rather than the 10 to 12 that was typical during that era, thus further helping the coverage unit. His average was 44.6 yards on 47 punts as a rookie and he had his best seasons for pass receiving in 1948, with 20 catches for 295 yards (14.8 avg.) and a TD and 23 for 359 yards (15.6 avg.) in ’49, the AAFC’s last year. In 1950, his first NFL season, Gillom punted 66 times for a 43.2-yard average.

1951 Season Summary
Appeared in all 12 games
[Bracketed numbers indicate league rank in Top 20]

Punting
Punts – 73 [2, tied with Joe Geri]
Yards – 3321 [1]
Average – 45.5 [1]
Punts blocked – 0
Longest punt – 66 yards

Pass Receiving
Receptions – 11
Yards – 164
Yards per catch – 14.9
TDs – 0

Kickoff Returns
Returns – 2
Yards – 25
Average per return – 12.5
TDs – 0
Longest return – 15 yards

Scoring
TDs – 1         
Points – 6

Postseason: 1G (NFL Championship at LA Rams)
Punts – 4
Yards – 148
Average – 37.0
Longest punt – 38 yards

Browns went 11-1 to finish first in the NFL American Conference. Lost NFL Championship to Los Angeles Rams (24-17).

Aftermath:
Gillom led the NFL in punting again in 1952, averaging 45.7 yards, when he was also chosen for the Pro Bowl. He spent a total of ten seasons with the Browns, until being waived in 1956, and averaged 43.1 yards on 492 punts. Of that, 107 punts for a 40.5-yard average were in the AAFC and 385 for a 43.8 average came in the NFL. He also caught a total of 74 passes for 1003 yards (14.6 avg.) and three touchdowns (AAFC: 45 for 678 yards and a TD, NFL: 29 for 405 yards and two scores).

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Highlighted Years features players who were first-team All-League* selections or league* or conference** leaders in the following statistical categories:

Rushing: Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Passing: Yards, Completion Pct., Yards per Attempt, TDs, Rating
Receiving: Catches, Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Scoring: TDs, Points, Field Goals (min. 5)
All-Purpose: Total Yards
Defense: Interceptions, Sacks
Kickoff Returns: Average
Punt Returns: Average
Punting: Average

*Leagues include NFL (1920 to date), AFL (1926), AFL (1936-37), AAFC (1946-49), AFL (1960-69), WFL (1974-75), USFL (1983-85)

**NFC/AFC since 1970

June 16, 2016

Highlighted Year: Tommy Casanova, 1976

Safety, Cincinnati Bengals


Age: 26
5th season in pro football & with Bengals
College: LSU
Height: 6’2”   Weight: 194

Prelude:
The versatile Casanova saw action on both offense and defense in college, as well as returning kicks, and despite injuries, he received consensus All-American honors as a defensive back in 1970 and ’71. Casanova was chosen by the Bengals in the second round of the 1972 NFL draft and moved directly into the starting lineup at free safety, intercepting five passes while also returning 30 punts for a 9.6-yard average that included a touchdown. He missed five games due to injury in ’73, although still intercepted four passes, but came back to gain a Pro Bowl selection in 1974. Casanova was shifted to strong safety in ’75 and received first-team All-AFC honors from the Associated Press.

1976 Season Summary
Appeared in 11 of 14 games
[Bracketed numbers indicate league rank in Top 20]

Interceptions – 5 [17, tied with six others]
Most interceptions, game – 1 on five occasions
Int. return yards – 109 [9]
Most int. return yards, game – 33 (on 1 int.) vs. Green Bay 9/26
Int. TDs – 2 [2, tied with Prentice McCray, Jim Merlo & John Rowser]
Fumble recoveries – 1
Fumble recovery TDs – 1

Punt Returns
Returns – 10
Yards – 45
Average per return – 4.5
TDs – 0
Longest return – 15 yards

Scoring
TDs – 3
Points – 18

Awards & Honors:
1st team All-NFL: AP
2nd team All-NFL: PFWA, NEA
1st team All-AFC: AP, UPI, Pro Football Weekly
Pro Bowl

Bengals went 10-6 to finish second in the AFC Central while leading the conference in interceptions (26).

Aftermath:
Casanova had another Pro Bowl season in 1977 but, having started medical school while playing football, he retired to complete his degree and go into medicine. Overall, Casanova started 65 games for the Bengals and intercepted 17 passes, two of which he ran back for touchdowns. He also scored on a fumble recovery. As a punt returner, he averaged 8.6 yards on 91 returns with one TD. He was a consensus first-team All-NFL choice once, received first- or second-team All-AFC recognition after three other seasons, and was chosen to three Pro Bowls. In addition to practicing medicine as an ophthalmologist, Casanova also went on to serve in the Louisiana state senate.

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Highlighted Years features players who were first-team All-League* selections or league* or conference** leaders in the following statistical categories:

Rushing: Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Passing: Yards, Completion Pct., Yards per Attempt, TDs, Rating
Receiving: Catches, Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Scoring: TDs, Points, Field Goals (min. 5)
All-Purpose: Total Yards
Defense: Interceptions, Sacks
Kickoff Returns: Average
Punt Returns: Average
Punting: Average

*Leagues include NFL (1920 to date), AFL (1926), AFL (1936-37), AAFC (1946-49), AFL (1960-69), WFL (1974-75), USFL (1983-85)

**NFC/AFC since 1970

June 13, 2016

Highlighted Year: Mike Ditka, 1962

Tight End, Chicago Bears


Age: 23 (Oct. 18)
2nd season in pro football & with Bears
College: Pittsburgh
Height: 6’3”   Weight: 230

Prelude:
Ditka was a three-sport athlete in college (baseball and basketball were the others). He led the team in pass receiving three times and was a consensus first-team All-American as a senior. Ditka also played linebacker and defensive end with distinction and punted, setting the tone for his later pro career with his competitive fury and hard-nosed playing style as well as being a skillful performer. He was chosen by the Bears with the fifth overall pick in the first round of the 1961 NFL draft (he was chosen by the Houston Oilers of the AFL, also in the first round) and quickly became a key player on offense at tight end with his ability as a receiver as well as blocker. He caught 56 passes for 1076 yards (19.2 avg.) and 12 touchdowns in ’61 and, in addition to receiving Rookie of the Year honors from UPI and The Sporting News, was also a first-team All-NFL selection of NEA and The Sporting News and was chosen to the Pro Bowl.

1962 Season Summary
Appeared in all 14 games
[Bracketed numbers indicate league rank in Top 20]

Pass Receiving
Receptions – 58 [5, tied with Tommy McDonald & Johnny Morris]    
Most receptions, game – 8 (for 132 yds.) vs. San Francisco 10/14
Yards – 904 [10]
Most yards, game – 155 (on 6 catches) vs. LA Rams 12/9
Average gain – 15.6 [19]
TDs – 5 [18, tied with five others]
100-yard receiving games - 4

Scoring
TDs – 6
Points – 36

Awards & Honors:
1st team All-NFL: UPI, NEA
2nd team All-NFL: AP
1st team All-Western Conference: Sporting News
Pro Bowl

Bears went 9-5 to finish third in the NFL Western Conference.   

Aftermath:
Ditka was selected to the Pro Bowl in each of the next three seasons and was a consensus first-team All-NFL selection in 1963, when the Bears won the NFL Championship, and ’64, when he caught a career-high 75 passes. He did much to define the newly-evolved position of tight end with his outstanding combination of skills. After a contract dispute fouled his relations with Chicago’s owner and head coach, George Halas, Ditka was traded to the Philadelphia Eagles in 1967, but accumulated wear-and-tear caused his production to drop off during two injury-plagued seasons. After catching 316 passes for 4503 yards and 34 TDs in six years with the Bears, he had just 39 receptions for 385 yards and four TDs in 20 games for the Eagles. Traded again to Dallas, Ditka split time in his last four seasons. He had 30 catches in 1971, a year in which he also caught a touchdown pass in a winning Super Bowl appearance. Ditka retired into coaching after the ’72 season, having caught a total of 427 passes for 5812 yards and 43 TDs. His greatest years came with the Bears, where he was a consensus first-team All-NFL selection twice, received at least second-team recognition after four other seasons, and was named to the Pro Bowl five straight times. He later became head coach of the Bears, leading them to a NFL title in 1985, and also was head coach of the Saints. Ditka’s #89 was retired by the Bears and he was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame, Class of 1988.

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Highlighted Years features players who were consensus first-team All-League* selections or league* or conference** leaders in the following statistical categories:

Rushing: Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Passing: Yards, Completion Pct., Yards per Attempt, TDs, Rating
Receiving: Catches, Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Scoring: TDs, Points, Field Goals (min. 5)
All-Purpose: Total Yards
Defense: Interceptions, Sacks
Kickoff Returns: Average
Punt Returns: Average
Punting: Average

*Leagues include NFL (1920 to date), AFL (1926), AFL (1936-37), AAFC (1946-49), AFL (1960-69), WFL (1974-75), USFL (1983-85)

**NFC/AFC since 1970

June 12, 2016

Highlighted Year: Muhsin Muhammad, 1999

Wide Receiver, Carolina Panthers


Age: 26
4th season in pro football & with Panthers
College: Michigan State
Height: 6’2”   Weight: 220

Prelude:
Muhammad caught 50 passes for 867 yards (17.3 avg.) and three touchdowns in 1995, his last college season, and was chosen by the Panthers in the second round of the ’96 NFL draft. While hampered by a hamstring injury as a rookie, he showed promise, catching 25 passes for 407 yards (16.3 avg.) and impressing with his size as well as speed. Following another injury-plagued season in 1997, Muhammad started every game in ’98 and broke out with 68 receptions for 941 yards (13.8 avg.) and six TDs.

1999 Season Summary
Appeared in 15 of 16 games
[Bracketed numbers indicate league rank in Top 20]

Pass Receiving
Receptions – 96 [3, 1st in NFC]    
Most receptions, game – 11 (for 126 yds.) vs. San Francisco 12/18
Yards – 1253 [7]
Most yards, game – 151 (on 8 catches) at Washington 10/3
Average gain – 13.1
TDs – 8 [12, tied with Az-Zahir Hakim, Kevin Johnson & Keyshawn Johnson]
100-yard receiving games – 5

Scoring
TDs – 8
Points – 48

Awards & Honors:
Pro Bowl

Panthers went 8-8 to finish second in the NFC West while ranking second in the NFL in passing yards (4161) and third in touchdowns (50).

Aftermath:
Muhammad led the NFL with 102 catches in 2000, gaining 1183 yards (11.6 avg.) and scoring six touchdowns. Injuries and off-field problems caused his production to drop off significantly in 2001, but there was improvement in 2002 and ’03, and he had an 85-yard scoring reception in the Super Bowl loss to New England following the latter season. Muhammad had a big year in 2004, leading the NFL with 1405 yards and 16 TDs on his 93 pass receptions and receiving consensus first-team All-NFL honors as well as selection to the Pro Bowl. However, he was released by the Panthers in the offseason due to contract issues and moved on to the Chicago Bears in 2005, where with his diminished speed combining with inconsistency at quarterback, his numbers dropped off. He spent three years with the Bears before returning to Carolina for his last two seasons in 2008 and ’09. Overall, Muhammad caught 860 passes for 11,438 yards (13.3 avg.) and 62 touchdowns. Of those totals, 696 receptions for 9255 yards and 50 TDs came with the Panthers. Muhammad was a first-team All-NFL selection once and was named to two Pro Bowls.

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Highlighted Years features players who were consensus first-team All-League* selections or league* or conference** leaders in the following statistical categories:

Rushing: Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Passing: Yards, Completion Percentage, Yards per Attempt, TDs, Rating
Receiving: Catches, Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Scoring: TDs, Points, Field Goals (min. 5)
All-Purpose: Total Yards
Defense: Interceptions, Sacks
Kickoff Returns: Average
Punt Returns: Average
Punting: Average

*Leagues include NFL (1920 to date), AFL (1926), AFL (1936-37), AAFC (1946-49), AFL (1960-69), WFL (1974-75), USFL (1983-85)

**NFC/AFC since 1970