July 3, 2015

1975: Eagles Obtain Stan Walters from Bengals


On July 3, 1975 the Cincinnati Bengals traded OT Stan Walters and QB Wayne Clark to the Philadelphia Eagles for QB John Reaves and an unspecified draft choice (it turned out to be a second-round pick for 1976). The transaction was only noteworthy at the time in that a failed first-round draft choice was being dealt away, but one of the players received in return would achieve stature with his new club.

John Reaves had become a forgotten backup for the Eagles after being drafted in the first round out of Florida in 1972. In college he established himself as an outstanding passer, throwing for what was then an NCAA-record 7549 yards and winning the Sammy Baugh Trophy as a senior in ’71. He was tossed into the lineup as a rookie with a poor team, unused to calling his own plays and unprepared for facing NFL defenses. Reaves completed 48.2 percent of his passes for 1508 yards and seven touchdowns while giving up 12 interceptions and, playing with torn ankle ligaments, being sacked 38 times. The Eagles obtained Roman Gabriel, a well-established veteran, from the Rams the next year and Reaves became a little-used backup. When Gabriel, who began to fade after an outstanding ’73 season, was benched for the last three games in 1974, it was in favor of rookie Mike Boryla, not Reaves.

The 25-year-old Stan Walters was 6’6”, 270 and had spent three seasons with the Bengals after being drafted in the ninth round in 1972 out of Syracuse. He became part of the starting lineup midway through his rookie season but a bout with hepatitis limited him to four games in ’73. Walters was again the starting right tackle in 1974 although it was anticipated that he would have to compete for a starting job in ’75 due to the return of Vern Holland from injury.

Wayne Clark, 28, had been acquired from San Diego in ‘74 for QB Virgil Carter and was a backup to Ken Anderson. He started one game when Anderson was injured and it was an abysmal season-ending loss to Pittsburgh in which he completed three of eight passes for 23 yards and gave up an interception. Clark had seen his most significant action the preceding year with the Chargers, tossing 90 passes, completing 40, and giving up nine interceptions while throwing for no touchdowns.

Clark never played with Philadelphia, but Stan Walters moved into the starting lineup for the Eagles, who dropped from 7-7 in ’74 to 4-10 in 1975. He did not make much of an impression that first year and was judged as lacking the necessary fire to be more successful, but in ‘76 new Head Coach Dick Vermeil challenged him to do better and his performance steadily improved. By the time the club reached the postseason in 1978, he was part of an outstanding tandem with RT Jerry Sisemore, despite playing with an injured ankle. Walters was named to the Pro Bowl for the first of two straight seasons and was in the starting lineup as the Eagles attained the NFC Championship in 1980. He spent a total of nine years with Philadelphia, until 1983, and started 148 regular season games plus another seven in the playoffs. The well-spoken Walters later became a radio color commentator on Eagles game broadcasts for 14 years.



Reaves spent four years as the backup to Anderson in Cincinnati, winning two starts in 1975 and ’77 but losing all four in extended relief in 1978. It was his last year with the club. Overall, he threw for 1546 yards and seven TDs while giving up 17 interceptions. Unfortunately, Reaves became better known for off-field problems with alcohol and drugs and, after moving on to the Minnesota Vikings and Houston Oilers, his pro career came to an apparent end in 1981. He resurfaced in the USFL in ’83 and played well for the Tampa Bay Bandits under the tutelage of another ex-Florida star quarterback, Head Coach Steve Spurrier, showing off the passing ability that had attracted the Eagles in 1972. Reaves ultimately made it back to the NFL in 1987 as a strike replacement player with the Buccaneers but never lived up to his first round draft status.   

As a footnote, the second-round draft choice that the Bengals obtained in the trade was used to take a guard, Glenn Bujnoch, out of Texas A & M. He was with Cincinnati for seven seasons and started a total of 67 games.

July 2, 2015

Highlighted Year: Chris Chambers, 2003

Wide Receiver, Miami Dolphins



Age: 25
3rd season in pro football & with Dolphins
College: Wisconsin
Height: 5’11” Weight: 210

Prelude:
Chambers caught 127 passes for 2004 yards and 16 touchdowns in college and was chosen by the Dolphins in the second round of the 2001 NFL draft. While part of a run-oriented offense, he started seven games and caught 48 passes for 883 yards, averaging 18.4 yards per reception and scoring seven TDs. After impressing as a deep threat in his first season, Chambers had a lesser year in 2002 while opponents concentrated more coverage on him. He had 52 receptions for 734 yards, for a 14.1-yard average and just three touchdowns.

2003 Season Summary
Appeared in all 16 games
[Bracketed numbers indicate league rank in Top 20]

Pass Receiving
Receptions – 64      
Most receptions, game – 9 (for 153 yds.) vs. NY Jets 12/28
Yards – 963 [18]
Most yards, game – 153 (on 9 catches) vs. NY Jets 12/28
Average gain – 15.0 [13]
TDs – 11 [3, 1st in AFC]
100-yard receiving games – 2

Rushing
Attempts – 4
Yards – 30
Average gain – 7.5
TDs – 0

Scoring
TDs – 11 [10, tied with four others]
Points – 66

Dolphins went 10-6 to finish second in the AFC East.

Aftermath:
Fast and athletic, but not always consistent, Chambers followed up in 2004 with 69 catches for 898 yards (13.0 avg.) and seven touchdowns. He had his best season in ’05, achieving career-highs with 82 receptions for 1118 yards (13.6 avg.) and 11 TDs and was named to the Pro Bowl. But he dropped back to 59 catches for 677 yards (11.5 avg.) and four scores in 2006 and was dealt to San Diego during the ’07 season, where he paired well with WR Vincent Jackson. Injuries limited his performance in 2008 and he was waived during ’09 and picked up by the Kansas City Chiefs. He spent one last injury-plagued year with the Chiefs in 2010, his last season. Overall, Chambers caught 540 passes for 7648 yards (14.2 avg.) and 58 touchdowns, with 405 of those receptions for 5688 yards (14.0 avg.) and 43 TDs coming with Miami. He was chosen to one Pro Bowl.

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Highlighted Years features players who were consensus first-team All-League* selections or league* or conference** leaders in the following statistical categories:

Rushing: Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Passing: Yards, Completion Pct., Yards per Attempt, TDs, Rating
Receiving: Catches, Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Scoring: TDs, Points, Field Goals (min. 5)
All-Purpose: Total Yards
Defense: Interceptions, Sacks
Kickoff Returns: Average
Punt Returns: Average
Punting: Average

*Leagues include NFL (1920 to date), AFL (1926), AFL (1936-37), AAFC (1946-49), AFL (1960-69), WFL (1974-75), USFL (1983-85)

**NFC/AFC since 1970

June 30, 2015

1984: Stars Defeat Generals in USFL Playoff Contest


Two rivals from the Atlantic Division of the United States Football League faced off in a First Round Playoff game on June 30, 1984. The Philadelphia Stars had gone 16-2 during the regular season, the league’s best record, but both losses were to the New Jersey Generals, the club that finished second in the division with a 14-4 tally. The second meeting had been just the previous week, and Philadelphia had been uncharacteristically sloppy in both contests.

The Stars, who narrowly lost the USFL Championship game the previous year, were coached by Jim Mora. QB Chuck Fusina, the league’s most efficient passer, directed the ball-control offense that featured RB Kelvin Bryant (pictured #44 above, with WR Willie Collier) operating behind a solid line. The tough and opportunistic defense that included All-League performers in NT Pete Kugler, LB Sam Mills, CB Garcia Lane, and FS Mike Lush yielded a league-low 12.5 points per game.

New Jersey was coached by Walt Michaels and was much improved over the 1983 unit thanks to the addition of significant veteran talent. QB Brian Sipe was one of those upgrades, and while he didn’t have a big season, he was far more effective than the signal callers of the previous year. RB Herschel Walker was again the key to the offense, but he suffered from a sore shoulder all season and looked more tentative, although he still rushed for 1399 yards and 16 TDs while FB Maurice Carthon also reached a thousand yards (1042). The defense benefited from the addition of linebackers Willie Harper, Bobby Leopold, and Jim LeClair, FS Gary Barbaro, and CB Kerry Justin.

The game was played before 19,038 fans at Franklin Field of the Univ. of Pennsylvania, once home of the NFL Eagles, due to a conflict with major league baseball’s Phillies for use of Veterans Stadium. The locker rooms were too small to accommodate the teams and they had to suit up at the nearby Hollenbeck Center and walk to the stadium.

It had rained during the morning, but stopped prior to kickoff. In the first quarter, a promising ten-play possession for the Generals ended with a pass by Brian Sipe being intercepted by FS Scott Woerner at the Philadelphia 16, and he returned it to his 40.  

The opening period remained scoreless as the teams traded punts. Early in the second quarter, another turnover by the Generals set up the first score of the game. Pete Kugler sacked Sipe, causing the quarterback to fumble. LB John Bunting recovered and the Stars took just three plays to travel 49 yards. Chuck Fusina connected with WR Scott Fitzkee for 17 yards and FB David Riley for 22, and Kelvin Bryant reached the end zone on a ten-yard sweep. David Trout added the extra point and Philadelphia was ahead by 7-0 three minutes into the period.



New Jersey’s next possession ended in a punt and Garcia Lane, sprung thanks to outstanding blocks by DB Bill Hardee and WR Herbert Harris, returned it 70 yards for a TD. Trout again converted to widen the home team’s lead to 14-0.

The Generals, down by two touchdowns, were forced out of their game plan, but they advanced into Philadelphia territory on the next series, helped along by a roughing-the-passer penalty on the Stars. However, the visitors came up empty when Roger Ruzek missed on a 42-yard field goal attempt. Bryant immediately took off on a 38-yard jaunt to key an eight-play, 75-yard drive that culminated in Bryant catching an 11-yard touchdown pass over his shoulder in the corner of the end zone. Trout added the point after. The first half ended with Ruzek failing on a field goal try from 49 yards and, despite New Jersey running more plays and generating the most yards, the Stars took a 21-0 lead into halftime. Adding to their problems, the Generals lost three starters to injuries in the hard-hitting first half: Gary Barbaro, Kerry Justin, and G Wayne Harris.

The Stars punted following the first possession of the third quarter and New Jersey advanced into scoring territory, but after reaching the Philadelphia 15 following Herschel Walker’s run to convert a fourth down, the Stars stiffened on defense and Ruzek missed a third field goal attempt, hooking to the left from 42 yards.  

Philadelphia proceeded to put together a 20-play drive that covered 75 yards and ran 11:48 off the clock. Bryant punched over from the one for a touchdown that, with Trout’s PAT, put the Stars up by 28-0 with 10:41 to play and effectively sealed the win. The Generals finally got on the board when Sipe threw to WR Clarence Collins for a 14-yard TD, but it was of no consequence. Philadelphia advanced to the next round by a decisive score of 28-7.

New Jersey had the edge in total yards (313 to 269) and first downs (24 to 17), but also suffered the game’s only two turnovers, both of which were turned into points by the Stars. Philadelphia held the Generals to just 70 yards on the ground and recorded three sacks, to one by New Jersey. There were a total of 16 penalties called in the hard-hitting game, with the Stars getting flagged 10 times.

Kelvin Bryant rushed for 117 yards on 23 carries that included two touchdowns and scored another on one of his two catches for 32 yards. Chuck Fusina didn’t go to the air often but was typically efficient, completing 9 of 14 passes for 121 yards and a touchdown, including six-of-six for 77 yards in the first half. David Riley and Scott Fitzkee caught three passes apiece, for 39 and 33 yards, respectively.

For the Generals, Brian Sipe was successful on 24 of 40 throws for 259 yards and a TD along with one interception. Herschel Walker was limited to 50 yards on 15 rushing attempts but led the club with 6 catches for 79 yards. Clarence Collins contributed 5 receptions for 62 yards and a score and TE Jeff Spek added 58 yards on his 5 catches.

“A loss today meant the season,” said Kelvin Bryant. “We really wanted to get them because they were the only team to beat us.”

“We were a lot more physical today, there was a lot of emotion out there,” said Coach Mora of the Stars.

The Stars went on to defeat the Birmingham Stallions the following week for the Eastern Conference title and won the USFL Championship handily over the Arizona Wranglers. New Jersey came back in 1985 to go 11-7 and again qualify for the playoffs, and once more fell to the Stars, now based in Baltimore, in the first round.

June 29, 2015

Highlighted Year: Jim Arnold, 1984

Punter, Kansas City Chiefs


Age: 23
2nd season in pro football & with Chiefs
College: Vanderbilt
Height: 6’2”   Weight: 212

Prelude:
Arnold was a four-time All-Southeastern Conference choice in college as well as consensus All-American as a senior in 1982. He was chosen by the Chiefs in the fifth round of the ‘83 NFL draft and averaged 39.9 yards on 93 punts as a rookie.

1984 Season Summary
Appeared in all 16 games
[Bracketed numbers indicate league rank in Top 20]

Punting
Punts – 98 [1, tied with Rohn Stark]
Most punts, game – 9 at Denver 9/23, vs. Houston 11/11
Yards – 4397 [1]
Average – 44.9 [1]
Best average, game – 50.9 (on 8 punts) at LA Raiders 11/18
Punts blocked – 0
Longest punt – 63 yards

Rushing
Attempts – 1
Yards – 0
TDs – 0

Awards & Honors:
2nd team All-NFL: AP

Chiefs went 8-8 to finish fourth in the AFC West.

Aftermath:
A lesser performance in 1985 set the stage for Arnold’s release prior to the ‘86 season and he was picked up by Detroit for the last seven games, averaging 42.6 yards on 36 punts. He followed up with a 1987 season in which he was a consensus first-team All-NFL and Pro Bowl selection after averaging 43.6 yards on 46 punts during the strike-interrupted campaign. He had another Pro Bowl year in ‘88 after punting a team-record 97 times for a 42.4-yard average, which topped the NFC. Arnold ended up playing a total of eight years for the Lions and set a franchise career records with 536 punts, averaging 42.7 yards per kick. He played for the Miami Dolphins in 1994 before retiring. Overall, Arnold punted 866 times over 12 seasons for a 42.3-yard average (284 for a 42.0 average with the Chiefs). He was named to the Pro Bowl twice and received first- or second-team All-NFL honors on three occasions.

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Highlighted Years features players who were first-team All-League* selections or league* or conference** leaders in the following statistical categories:

Rushing: Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Passing: Yards, Completion Pct., Yards per Attempt, TDs, Rating
Receiving: Catches, Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Scoring: TDs, Points, Field Goals (min. 5)
All-Purpose: Total Yards
Defense: Interceptions, Sacks
Kickoff Returns: Average
Punt Returns: Average
Punting: Average

*Leagues include NFL (1920 to date), AFL (1926), AFL (1936-37), AAFC (1946-49), AFL (1960-69), WFL (1974-75), USFL (1983-85)

**NFC/AFC since 1970

June 28, 2015

Highlighted Year: Chris Hanson, 2002

Punter, Jacksonville Jaguars


Age: 26 (Oct. 25)
4th season in pro football, 3rd active in NFL & 2nd with Jaguars
College: Marshall
Height: 6’1”   Weight: 211

Prelude:
The left-footed Hanson was an undrafted free agent signed by the Cleveland Browns in 1999 but was waived following training camp. He was picked up by the Packers, appeared in the season opener, and moved to the practice squad until he was let go in midseason. Hanson’s next stop was Miami, who allocated him to the Barcelona Dragons of NFL Europe for the 2000 spring season. He punted 50 times for a 42.8-yard average but an injury suffered in the season finale caused him to be placed on injured reserve for the NFL season. Released during the 2001 preseason, Hanson was picked up by the Jaguars and averaged 43.6 yards on 82 punts.

2002 Season Summary
Appeared in all 16 games
[Bracketed numbers indicate league rank in Top 20]

Punting
Punts – 81 [8, tied with Chris Gardocki & Dave Zastudil]
Most punts, game – 8 vs. Houston 10/27
Yards – 3583
Average – 44.2 [2, 1st in AFC]
Best average, game – 53.2 (on 5 punts) vs. NY Jets 9/29
Punts blocked – 0
Longest punt – 64 yards

Awards & Honors:
2nd team All-NFL: AP
1st team All-NFC: Pro Football Weekly
Pro Bowl

Jaguars went 6-10 to finish third in the AFC South.

Aftermath:
Hanson’s 2003 season ended in bizarre fashion after suffering a serious injury to his right leg when gashed by swinging an axe that had been placed along with an oak stump in the locker room by Head Coach Jack Del Rio as a motivational tool. He returned in good form in ’04 and stayed with Jacksonville for another two years. A drop in performance in 2006 caused the Jaguars to cut him in favor of rookie draftee Adam Podlesh and, after being dropped in the 2007 preseason by the Saints, Hanson moved on to New England for three years, finishing up in 2009. Overall, he averaged 42.5 yards on 577 punts, with 424 for a 42.9-yard average coming with Jacksonville.

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Highlighted Years features players who were first-team All-League* selections or league* or conference** leaders in the following statistical categories:

Rushing: Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Passing: Yards, Completion Pct., Yards per Attempt, TDs, Rating
Receiving: Catches, Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Scoring: TDs, Points, Field Goals (min. 5)
All-Purpose: Total Yards
Defense: Interceptions, Sacks
Kickoff Returns: Average
Punt Returns: Average
Punting: Average

*Leagues include NFL (1920 to date), AFL (1926), AFL (1936-37), AAFC (1946-49), AFL (1960-69), WFL (1974-75), USFL (1983-85)

**NFC/AFC since 1970

June 26, 2015

1978: Bengals Trade Parrish & Bacon to Redskins


On June 26, 1978 the Cincinnati Bengals traded two able but discontented players to the Washington Redskins. CB Lemar Parrish and DE Coy Bacon were exchanged for Washington’s 1979 first draft choice. It assured that, for the eleventh straight year, the Redskins would not have a selection in the first round. Under General Manager/Head Coach George Allen since 1971, they had invested heavily in veteran talent. Allen had departed following the ’77 season and the trade thus marked one of the first major deals by new Washington GM Bobby Beathard.

“It’s a big step for us, getting a couple of guys who have played that well,” said Washington’s incoming Head Coach Jack Pardee. “The number one pick is valuable. You hate to give one up. We are looking for more than one player who could help us right away. It had to be a multi-player deal.”

Lemar Parrish was 30 and had played eight seasons with Cincinnati. Outstanding as a kick returner as well as in the defensive backfield, he had been selected to the Pro Bowl in each of his first two seasons and again in the four years from 1974 to ‘77. An unheralded seventh-round draft choice in 1970 out of Lincoln University of Missouri, Parrish intercepted 25 passes, with a high of seven in 1971, and returned four of them for touchdowns. He also scored three more times on fumble recoveries and averaged 9.2 yards on 130 punt returns, with a league-leading 18.8 average in 1974 that included two TDs. His average on 61 kickoff returns was 24.7, with a top figure of 30.1 as a rookie.

Coy Bacon was 35 and a ten-year NFL veteran, although only the last two seasons were with the Bengals. Having played collegiately at Jackson State, he had originally performed in the minor league United and Continental Football Leagues and, after spending a year on the Dallas taxi squad, was obtained by the Rams in 1968, alternating with aging veteran DT Roger Brown the following year. Shifted to right end in 1970, he began to develop into an outstanding pass rusher and reached the Pro Bowl in ‘72. Bacon was traded to San Diego in 1973 as part of the deal that brought QB John Hadl to Los Angeles and arrived in Cincinnati in 1976, having been dealt for WR Charlie Joiner. He was named to the Pro Bowl in each of his seasons with the Bengals and, while sacks were not yet compiled for individual players, unofficially led the NFL with 26 in 1976.

Both players had been outspoken in denouncing the club and demanding a trade. Parrish was unhappy with his salary and had indicated that he would play out his option. Bacon did not like the new 3-4 defensive alignment. GM Paul Brown indicated that either rookie Ray Griffin, brother of double-Heisman Trophy winner Archie, also a Bengal, or Melvin Morgan would replace Parrish in the lineup at cornerback. However, it ended up being Louis Breeden, a first-year player who intercepted three passes on his way to 33 in ten years with the club. Rookie Ross Browner from Notre Dame, the team’s first draft choice, was to fill Bacon’s place. The three-man front that had alienated Bacon didn’t last the season, but Browner, who was injured at the start, came on strong in the second half. It was a disappointing year for the Bengals as a whole as they dropped to 4-12 following six straight records of .500 or better. Things would not turn around until 1981, when Cincinnati surged to the AFC Championship, and Breeden and Browner were both still starting in the defensive unit.

The veteran players filled areas of need for Washington. Parrish was expected to replace the retired Pat Fischer and it was hoped that Bacon would improve the pass rush. Parrish played well when healthy, but a broken arm cost him five games. Bacon (pictured below) started off strong but faded as the season progressed, along with other aging veterans on the defense. Washington followed suit in going 8-8, its worst record since the pre-George Allen year of 1970.


Both players had better seasons in 1979 and beyond. Parrish intercepted nine passes and was a consensus first-team All-NFL choice as well as Pro Bowl selection. He was selected to the Pro Bowl once more in ’80 and was traded to Buffalo following the 1981 season. Overall, he intercepted 21 of his career total of 47 passes in a Washington uniform (he picked off one last throw as a member of the Bills in ’82).

Bacon was unofficially credited with 15 sacks in 1979 and 11 in ’80. At age 39 and clearly past his prime, though, he had difficulties with new Head Coach Joe Gibbs and was waived prior to the 1981 season. He came back to play for the Washington Federals of the USFL in 1983. Unofficially, he was credited with 130 sacks over the course of his career.

As for the first draft pick that the Bengals acquired for 1979, it was used to take RB Charles Alexander from LSU, a two-time All-American who was nicknamed “Alexander the Great”. His pro career was not great, however, although he lasted for seven seasons in Cincinnati and was part of the 1981 AFC Championship team. He rushed for 2645 yards, averaging 3.5 yards per carry, caught 165 passes for 1130 yards, and scored a total of 15 touchdowns. Alexander’s best season was his second in 1980 when he achieved career highs in rushing (169 carries, 702 yards) and pass receptions (36).

June 23, 2015

Highlighted Year: Raymond Berry, 1957

Offensive End, Baltimore Colts



Age: 24
3rd season in pro football & with Colts
College: Southern Methodist
Height: 6’2”   Weight: 190

Prelude:
Berry didn’t have much opportunity to show off his pass receiving skills in college, catching just 33 passes and scoring one touchdown, but he was chosen as a future pick by the Colts in the 20th round of the 1954 NFL draft. He joined the team in ’55 and caught 13 passes as a rookie and, with the arrival of QB Johnny Unitas, improved to 37 receptions for 601 yards (16.2 avg.) in 1956. What he lacked in speed and heft he made up for with reliable hands and an excellent work ethic.

1957 Season Summary
Appeared in all 12 games
[Bracketed numbers indicate league rank in Top 20]

Pass Receiving
Receptions – 47 [2] 
Most receptions, game – 12 (for 224 yds.) at Washington
Yards – 800 [1]
Most yards, game – 224 (on 12 catches) at Washington
Average gain – 17.0 [17]
TDs – 6 [3, tied with Ray Renfro, Elroy Hirsch & Billy Wilson]
200-yard receiving games – 1
100-yard receiving games – 2

Scoring
TDs – 6 [9, tied with ten others]
Points – 36 [19, tied with ten others]

Awards & Honors:
1st team All-NFL: Sporting News
2nd team All-NFL: AP

Colts went 7-5 to finish third in the NFL Western Conference while leading the league in passing yards (2388) and touchdowns (41).

Aftermath:
Berry followed up by leading the NFL in pass receiving in each of the next three seasons, in pass receiving touchdowns in 1958 and ’59, and pass receiving yards in 1959 and ’60, despite being hindered by a leg injury in the latter year. He was a consensus first-team All-NFL selection after all three years and also had an outstanding performance in the 1958 NFL Championship overtime win over the Giants (12 catches, 178 yards, 1 TD). While he didn’t lead the league and missed two games due to injury in 1961, the steady Berry had a career-high 75 catches and was chosen to a fourth straight Pro Bowl. He went on to play a total of 13 seasons, all with the Colts, and retired as the career pass receiving leader at the time with 631, for 9275 yards (14.7 avg.) and 68 TDs. Berry was a consensus first-team All-NFL selection three times, received some first- or second-team honors after two other seasons, and was named to the Pro Bowl six times. He was selected to the 50th and 75th-year all-time NFL teams. The Colts retired his #82 and Berry was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame, Class of 1973. Berry went on to a coaching career and was head coach of the New England Patriots when they won the AFC Championship in 1985.

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Highlighted Years features players who were consensus first-team All-League* selections or league* or conference** leaders in the following statistical categories:

Rushing: Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Passing: Yards, Completion Pct., Yards per Attempt, TDs, Rating
Receiving: Catches, Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Scoring: TDs, Points, Field Goals (min. 5)
All-Purpose: Total Yards
Defense: Interceptions, Sacks
Kickoff Returns: Average
Punt Returns: Average
Punting: Average

*Leagues include NFL (1920 to date), AFL (1926), AFL (1936-37), AAFC (1946-49), AFL (1960-69), WFL (1974-75), USFL (1983-85)

**NFC/AFC since 1970