December 7, 2016

Highlighted Year: Todd Sauerbrun, 2001

Punter, Carolina Panthers



Age: 28
7th season in pro football, 1st with Panthers
College: West Virginia
Height: 5’10” Weight: 211

Prelude:
Sauerbrun averaged 46.2 yards on 177 punts in college, including a NCAA-record 48.4-yard average in 1994 when he was a consensus first-team All-American. He was chosen by the Chicago Bears in the second round of the 1995 NFL draft and spent five years with them, although he was limited to three games in ’98 due to a knee injury, and averaged 42.2 yards on 328 punts. Sauerbrun was a second-team All-NFC choice by UPI in 1996. He spent a season with Kansas City in 2000, where he averaged 44.6 yards on 82 punts, before signing with the Panthers in 2001.

2001 Season Summary
Appeared in all 16 games
[Bracketed numbers indicate league rank in Top 20]

Punting
Punts – 93 [3]
Most punts, game – 10 vs. NY Jets 10/28
Yards – 4419 [1]
Average – 47.5 [1]
Best average, game – 55.8 (on 6 punts) at Washington 10/21
Punts blocked – 1 [3, tied with five others]
Longest punt – 73 yards

Rushing
Attempts – 1
Yards – 0
Average gain – 0.0
TDs – 0

Awards & Honors:
1st team All-NFL: AP, PFWA, Sporting News
1st team All-NFC: Pro Football Weekly
Pro Bowl

Panthers went 1-15 to finish fifth in the NFC West.

Aftermath:
Sauerbrun followed up by again leading the NFL with a 45.5-yard average in 2002 and topped the NFC for a third straight time in 2003 by averaging 44.6 yards. With exceptional leg strength, he improved on his directional punting and also in not out-kicking the coverage. However, off-field issues led the Panthers to trade him to Denver in 2005, where he averaged 43.8 yards on 72 punts. Sauerbrun received a four-game suspension in ’06 for use of illegal supplements and was cut upon his return. He spent two games with the Patriots in 2006 and returned to the Broncos in ’07, his last year in the NFL. Sauerbrun finished his pro career with the Florida Tuskers of the UFL in 2009, punting 16 times for a 36.7-yard average. Overall, he punted 889 times in the NFL for an average of 44.1 yards. His greatest success came with the Panthers, where he averaged 45.5 yards on 350 punts. In a career that came to be overshadowed by controversy, he received consensus first-team All-NFL honors twice, some first- or second-team recognition after another season, and was selected to three Pro Bowls.

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Highlighted Years features players who were first-team All-League* selections or league* or conference** leaders in the following statistical categories:

Rushing: Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Passing: Yards, Completion Pct., Yards per Attempt, TDs, Rating
Receiving: Catches, Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Scoring: TDs, Points, Field Goals (min. 5)
All-Purpose: Total Yards
Defense: Interceptions, Sacks
Kickoff Returns: Average
Punt Returns: Average
Punting: Average

*Leagues include NFL (1920 to date), AFL (1926), AFL (1936-37), AAFC (1946-49), AFL (1960-69), WFL (1974-75), USFL (1983-85)

**NFC/AFC since 1970

December 5, 2016

Highlighted Year: Cookie Gilchrist, 1963

Fullback, Buffalo Bills


Age: 28
8th season in pro football, 2nd in AFL & with Bills
College: None
Height: 6’3”   Weight: 250

Prelude:
Ever inclined to follow his own path, Gilchrist showed up at the Cleveland Browns’ training camp directly out of high school. He failed to make the team and, foregoing college, went to Canada instead where he played for seven years with three teams in the CFL. Big, fast, and multi-talented, Gilchrist excelled on both offense and defense, but also wore out his welcome with each club. He came to the Bills for the 1962 season and moved directly into the starting lineup at fullback as well as handling the team’s placekicking. Gilchrist led the AFL in rushing with 1096 yards and scored a total of 128 points on 15 touchdowns, 8 field goals, and 14 PATs. He was named AFL Player of the Year by the Associated Press and UPI and received consensus first-team All-AFL honors. Injuries hindered his performance in ’63, although he came on strong in the second half of the season.

1963 Season Summary
Appeared in all 14 games
[Bracketed numbers indicate league rank in Top 20]

Rushing
Attempts – 232 [1]
Most attempts, game – 36 (for 243 yds.) vs. NY Jets
Yards – 979 [3]
Most yards, game – 243 yards (on 36 carries) vs. NY Jets
Average gain – 4.2 [5]
TDs – 12 [1]
200-yard rushing games – 1
100-yard rushing games – 3

Pass Receiving
Receptions – 24      
Most receptions, game – 5 (for 36 yds.) vs. San Diego 11/17
Yards – 211
Most yards, game – 58 (on 3 catches) vs. Denver 11/9
Average gain – 8.8
TDs – 2

Passing
Attempts – 1
Completions – 1
Yards – 35 [19]
TD passes – 0
Interceptions – 0

Scoring
TDs – 14 [2]
Points – 84 [4]

Postseason: 1 G (AFL Eastern Division playoff vs. Boston)
Rushing attempts – 8
Rushing yards – 7
Average gain rushing – 0.9
Rushing TDs – 0

Pass receptions – 1
Pass receiving yards – 11
Average yards per reception – 11.0
Pass receiving TDs – 0

Awards & Honors:
1st team All-AFL: NY Daily News
2nd team All-AFL: AP, UPI
AFL All-Star Game

Bills went 7-6-1 to tie for first place in the AFL Eastern Division. Lost Divisional playoff to Boston Patriots (26-8).

Aftermath:
Gilchrist led the AFL in rushing for a second time in 1964 (981 yards) in a title-winning year for the Bills, but became embroiled in conflict with Coach Lou Saban, was briefly suspended from the team, and in the offseason was dealt to the Denver Broncos. He again led the AFL in rushing attempts (252) as he ran for 954 yards in 1965. However, there was more turmoil and Gilchrist was traded to the expansion Miami Dolphins during the ’66 season where, playing on bad knees, he gained 262 yards in eight games. He returned to Denver in 1967 but saw scant action and retired. Altogether, Gilchrist rushed for 9204 yards (4911 in the CFL, 4293 in the AFL), caught 196 passes for 2203 more yards (86 for 1068 yards in the CFL, 110 for 1135 yards in the AFL), and scored 78 TDs (35 in the CFL, 43 in the AFL). An outstanding blocker as well as runner from scrimmage, he received consensus first-team All-AFL honors three times and was selected to four AFL All-Star Games.

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Highlighted Years features players who were first-team All-League* selections or league* or conference** leaders in the following statistical categories:

Rushing: Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Passing: Yards, Completion Pct., Yards per Attempt, TDs, Rating
Receiving: Catches, Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Scoring: TDs, Points, Field Goals (min. 5)
All-Purpose: Total Yards
Defense: Interceptions, Sacks
Kickoff Returns: Average
Punt Returns: Average
Punting: Average

*Leagues include NFL (1920 to date), AFL (1926), AFL (1936-37), AAFC (1946-49), AFL (1960-69), WFL (1974-75), USFL (1983-85)

**NFC/AFC since 1970

December 3, 2016

1967: Broncos Score 26 Points in Second Quarter to Upset Jets


The New York Jets were hoping to maintain their position atop the American Football League’s Eastern Division as they hosted the Denver Broncos on December 3, 1967. Steadily built up over five seasons under the direction of Head Coach Weeb Ewbank, the Jets had a potent passing game led by QB Joe Namath throwing to an outstanding group of receivers, although the running game was hindered by an injury to HB Emerson Boozer. The pass defense was suspect, but the Jets had a 7-2-1 record and looked poised to win their first division title.

Denver was once again in rebuilding mode, this time under Head Coach Lou Saban, who had previously achieved success in Buffalo. There were 18 rookies on the roster, including HB Floyd Little (pictured above), the prize first round draft choice out of Syracuse. Al Denson, shifted from tight end to flanker, was having a fine season but QB Steve Tensi, who came to the club from the Chargers with great expectations, had not been impressive and now his status was uncertain due to a back injury. The Broncos had a 2-10 record and hardly seemed a threat to New York.

It was a rainy day at Shea Stadium with 32,903 fans in attendance. The field was muddy and the teams slogged through a scoreless opening period, but the game broke open in the second quarter. First, FS Jack Lentz of the Broncos intercepted a Joe Namath pass, returning it 25 yards. The result was a 43-yard Bob Humphreys field goal. Two plays after the ensuing kickoff, Lentz again picked off a throw by Namath and returned it 47 yards to the New York three. From there, FB Bo Hickey ran for a touchdown. Humphreys was wide on the extra point attempt but, in rapid fashion, the visitors were ahead by 9-0.



It got worse for the Jets shortly thereafter when, forced to punt, Floyd Little returned the kick 72 yards, charging straight down the middle of the field for another Denver TD. With Humphreys successfully converting this time, the Denver lead was extended to 16-0.

Once again Namath went to the air with a long pass and once more he was intercepted, this time by CB Goldie Sellers, who ran it back 47 yards to the New York 30. Steve Tensi threw to split end Neal Sweeney for 15 yards and flanker Al Denson for a 10-yard touchdown. Humphreys once again added the point after.

On the next series, it was LB John Huard picking off another Namath pass, and Denver again took advantage when Humphreys booted a 47-yard field goal. With QB Mike Taliaferro in for Namath, the Jets were finally on the move with time running down in the first half. But on the last play, his pass was intercepted by LB Frank Richter at the goal line. It was the fifth Denver interception of the period, and the teams headed into the locker room with the visitors holding an astonishing 26-0 lead.

Namath was back behind center in the third quarter, and following a poor punt by the Broncos, the Jets finally got on the board when Jim Turner connected for a 39-yard field goal. However, the Broncos got a break on another miscue by the home team when DB Bill Baird fumbled a punt that was recovered by Denver center Larry Kaminski at the New York 12. Two plays later, HB Wendell Hayes ran five yards for a TD and Humphreys booted the extra point to make it a 33-3 game.

New York furiously fought back, and a drive was kept going following a roughing-the-kicker penalty. Namath completed passes to TE Pete Lammons for 11 yards, split end George Sauer for 27, and Lammons once again for an 18-yard touchdown. Turner tacked on the extra point and the score stood at 33-10 after three quarters.

The Jets continued to try and mount a comeback in the fourth quarter, scoring on two touchdown passes by Namath. He first connected with FB Mark Smolinski for an 18-yard TD, although a pass for a two-point conversion was unsuccessful. The second came when Namath fired a pass to HB Bill Mathis in the end zone and this time the Jets were able to add two points as Mathis took a pitchout and ran across the goal line. But it was all a case of too-little, too-late for the Jets. Denver held on to pull off the upset by a final score of 33-24.

New York dominated in total yards (345 to 142) and first downs (23 to 9). But the six turnovers proved devastating for the Jets, and while the Broncos didn’t generate much offense, they also didn’t turn the ball over. Denver was also penalized 9 times at a cost of 121 yards, to four flags thrown on the Jets.     

Steve Tensi completed just 7 of 16 passes for 59 yards and a touchdown, although with none intercepted. Bo Hickey topped the Denver runners with 48 yards on 16 carries that included a TD while Wendell Hayes picked up 43 yards on 18 attempts, also with a score. Floyd Little, whose sensational punt return was a significant part of the second quarter surge, suffered a broken collarbone and thus ran the ball only four times for 15 yards. Al Denson topped the receivers with two catches for 42 yards and a touchdown.



For the Jets, Joe Namath was successful on 24 of 60 throws for 292 yards and three TDs, but also gave up four interceptions. Pete Lammons (pictured at left) caught 9 passes for 106 yards and a touchdown and George Sauer added 5 pass receptions for 83 yards. Bill Mathis was the club’s top rusher with only 21 yards on five attempts although he contributed three catches for 54 yards and a score.

“You just can’t give away the ball six times and still win,” summed up New York’s Weeb Ewbank.

The loss dropped the Jets into a tie for first in the Eastern Division with Houston at 7-3-1 and they lost their next two games before winning the season finale, which caused them to end up a disappointing second with an 8-5-1 record. Denver finished at the bottom of the Western Division with a 3-11 tally.

Floyd Little had the distinction of scoring the only touchdown on a punt return in the AFL in 1967. While his rushing numbers were modest, with 381 yards on 130 carries (2.9 avg.), he led the league with a 16.9 average on 16 punt returns and also averaged 26.9 yards on 35 kickoff returns on the way to topping the circuit with 1626 all-purpose yards.

December 2, 2016

Highlighted Year: Rod Woodson, 1999

Safety, Baltimore Ravens



Age: 34
13th season in pro football, 2nd with Ravens
College: Purdue
Height: 6’0”   Weight: 200

Prelude:
An outstanding athlete coming out of college (he was a champion hurdler as well as football star), Woodson was chosen by the Pittsburgh Steelers in the first round of the 1987 NFL draft (10th overall). He held out and got a late start in the strike-interrupted ’87 season, and was used as a nickel back and kick returner, but swiftly developed into a star at cornerback and was team co-MVP in 1988. Woodson was a consensus first-team All-Pro as a kick returner and went to the Pro Bowl for the first time in ’89. With his outstanding speed, leaping ability, and body control, he became an annual Pro Bowl participant through 1994 and was a consensus first-team All-NFL selection at cornerback four times between 1990 and ‘94, including a 1993 season in which he was named NFL Defensive Player of the Year by the Associated Press. It appeared his career might be over due to a severe knee injury suffered in the first game of the 1995 season but, remarkably, Woodson returned to play in the Super Bowl following that season and was again selected to the Pro Bowl in 1996. He moved on to the 49ers in ’97 and then to the Ravens in 1998, who shifted him to free safety for the ’99 season.

1999 Season Summary
Appeared in all 16 games
[Bracketed numbers indicate league rank in Top 20]

Interceptions – 7 [1, tied with four others]
Most interceptions, game – 1 on seven occasions
Int. return yards – 195 [2]
Most int. return yards, game – 66 (on 1 int.) at Cleveland 11/7
Int. TDs – 2 [1, tied with six others]
Sacks – 0
Fumble recoveries – 2
Forced fumbles – 0
Tackles – 54
Assists – 12

Punt Returns
Returns – 2
Yards – 0
Average per return – 0.0
TDs – 0
Longest return – 7 yards

Scoring
TDs – 2
Points – 12

Awards & Honors:
Pro Bowl

Ravens went 8-8 to finish third in the AFC Central while leading the conference in fewest rushing yards allowed (1231).

Aftermath:
Woodson was again chosen to the Pro Bowl in each of the next two years with the Ravens, who also won the Super Bowl following the 2000 season largely due to their outstanding defense. With the Raiders in 2002, Woodson was a consensus first-team All-Pro for the sixth and last time, and also was named to the Pro Bowl for the last of 11 times at the age of 37. He finished up with Oakland in 2003, having intercepted 71 passes, the third most in NFL history, 12 of which were returned for touchdowns, a league record. Woodson was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame, Class of 2009.

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Highlighted Years features players who were consensus first-team All-League* selections or league* or conference** leaders in the following statistical categories:

Rushing: Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Passing: Yards, Completion Pct., Yards per Attempt, TDs, Rating
Receiving: Catches, Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Scoring: TDs, Points, Field Goals (min. 5)
All-Purpose: Total Yards
Defense: Interceptions, Sacks
Kickoff Returns: Average
Punt Returns: Average
Punting: Average

*Leagues include NFL (1920 to date), AFL (1926), AFL (1936-37), AAFC (1946-49), AFL (1960-69), WFL (1974-75), USFL (1983-85)

**NFC/AFC since 1970

December 1, 2016

1957: 49ers Take Advantage of Fumbles to Defeat Giants


The San Francisco 49ers were trying to remain in the NFL Western Conference title hunt as they traveled to New York to face the Giants on December 1, 1957. Coached by Frankie Albert, the 49ers had a productive offense that featured the passing of QB Y.A. Tittle (pictured at right) and a formidable ground attack led by HB Hugh McElhenny and FB Joe Perry. But after getting off to a 5-1 start, the club had lost three straight games to come into New York with a 5-4 record that had them a game behind the Colts and Lions.

The Giants, under Head Coach Jim Lee Howell, were at 7-2 and trying to keep up with the resurgent Cleveland Browns in the Eastern Conference. QB Charlie Conerly was a savvy clutch passer at age 36, HB Frank Gifford an outstanding all-purpose back, and the defense was tough.

There was a big crowd of 54,121 fans at Yankee Stadium. Late in the first quarter, the 49ers took advantage of a Frank Gifford fumble recovered by LB Matt Hazeltine and drove 59 yards in nine plays. FB Gene Babb finished it off with an eight-yard touchdown run and Gordie Soltau added the extra point.

As the contest headed into the second quarter, the Giants responded with a nine-play, 80-yard possession that concluded with HB Alex Webster blasting over the middle from a yard out for a TD. Ben Agajanian kicked the game-tying point after. Following another New York fumble, this time by Conerly when hit by Hazeltine (pictured below) and recovered by DT Bill Herchman, San Francisco went 25 yards in seven plays that resulted in Joe Perry plunging three yards for a TD. Soltau’s conversion put the visitors back in front by 14-7.



The Giants continued to hurt themselves as Gifford fumbled again when hit by LB Ed Henke on a reverse and it was recovered at the New York 11. The Niners weren’t able to reach the end zone, but Soltau kicked a 42-yard field goal to stretch their advantage to ten points. On the final play of the first half, New York’s Agajanian kicked a 35-yard field goal and the San Francisco lead was trimmed to 17-10 at halftime.

The 49ers started off the third quarter by advancing 78 yards in nine plays that featured Y.A. Tittle passing to Hugh McElhenny for a 38-yard gain and to end Billy Wilson for an 11-yard touchdown. Soltau’s extra point extended the lead to 24-10. The Giants, now in a fourteen-point hole, responded with a 75-yard advance that took 11 plays. Conerly passed to Gifford for a six-yard TD and Agajanian added the point after.

As the game headed into the fourth quarter, the Giants had opportunities but were consistently thwarted by the spirited San Francisco defense. Finally, another turnover, this time an interception, set up another score for the visitors as Soltau connected on a 37-yard field goal to make it a ten-point lead. That was more than enough as the 49ers held on to win by a final score of 27-17.

San Francisco led in total yards (316 to 265), with 193 yards on the ground alone, while the Giants had more first downs (21 to 19). New York turned the ball over seven times, five of them fumbles in the first half, to four suffered by the 49ers.

Y.A. Tittle completed 11 of 16 passes for 146 yards and a touchdown, although also giving up three interceptions, and ran the ball five times for 49 yards. Joe Perry rushed for 84 yards on 19 carries that included a TD and Gene Babb contributed 59 yards on 14 attempts. Billy Wilson topped the receivers with four catches for 64 yards and a TD and Hugh McElhenny contributed three pass receptions for 42 yards.



For the Giants, Charlie Conerly was successful on 17 of 25 throws for 215 yards and a TD along with an interception, but also coughed up four of the team’s fumbles. Frank Gifford (pictured at right), who was limited to 16 yards on 7 carries, caught 11 passes for 105 yards and a TD and accounted for two costly fumbles in the first half. Alex Webster topped the ground gainers with 33 yards on 9 attempts that included a score and added 38 more yards on two receptions.

“You don’t deserve to win when you lose the ball six times on fumbles,” summed up New York’s Coach Howell. “The 49ers gambled on shooting their linebackers through to get at Conerly and it paid off.”

The game proved to be a turning point heading into the final stretch for both teams.  San Francisco won its remaining two games, including a showdown with the Colts, to finish at 8-4 and tied with Detroit atop the Western Conference. In the resulting playoff game, the 49ers blew a big halftime lead to lose to the Lions. The Giants, on the other hand, lost their next two contests and placed second in the Eastern Conference at 7-5.

November 30, 2016

Highlighted Year: Jay Feely, 2001

Placekicker, Atlanta Falcons


Age: 25
3rd season in pro football, 1st in NFL & with Falcons
College: Michigan
Height: 5’10” Weight: 206

Prelude:
Feely was Michigan’s regular placekicker as a senior in 1998 and was successful on 16 of 20 field goal attempts and 34 of 35 PATs for a total of 82 points. Undrafted by the NFL out of college, Feely spent two seasons playing arena football, with the Florida Bobcats in 1999 and Tampa Bay Storm in 2000. He joined the Falcons in 2001 and beat out Jake Arians for the placekicking job previously held by Morten Andersen.

2001 Season Summary
Appeared in all 16 games
[Bracketed numbers indicate league rank in Top 20]

Kicking
Field goals – 29 [4, 1st in NFC]
Most field goals, game – 4 vs. Buffalo 12/23
Field goal attempts – 37 [2]
Most field goal attempts, game – 4 vs. St. Louis 12/2, vs. Buffalo 12/23
Field goal percentage – 78.4 [18]
PATs – 28 [20, tied with Martin Gramatica]
PAT attempts – 28 [20, tied with Martin Gramatica & Todd Peterson]
Longest field goal – 55 yards at Arizona 9/30

Scoring
Field Goals – 29
PATs – 28
Points – 115 [6, tied with David Akers & Matt Stover]

Falcons went 7-9 to finish fourth in the NFC West.

Aftermath:
Feely followed up with a bigger season in 2002, leading the NFL with 32 field goals out of 40 attempts and scoring a total of 138 points. He spent two more lesser seasons with the Falcons before moving on to the New York Giants in 2005, where he kicked a career-high 35 field goals out of 42 attempts and, a perfect 43-for-43 in extra points, also had his top scoring total with 148 points. Feely was with the Giants for another year in 2006, one with Miami in ‘07, two as a member of the New York Jets, and four in Arizona before finishing up with the Chicago Bears in 2014 at age 38. Consistent if not spectacular, Feely was successful on 332 of 402 field goal attempts (82.6 %) and, adding 449 PATs (with just three misses), scored a total of 1451 points. Of that, 98 field goals, 142 PATs, and 436 points came with Atlanta.

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Highlighted Years features players who were consensus first-team All-League* selections or league* or conference** leaders in the following statistical categories:

Rushing: Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Passing: Yards, Completion Percentage, Yards per Attempt, TDs, Rating
Receiving: Catches, Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Scoring: TDs, Points, Field Goals (min. 5)
All-Purpose: Total Yards
Defense: Interceptions, Sacks
Kickoff Returns: Average
Punt Returns: Average
Punting: Average

*Leagues include NFL (1920 to date), AFL (1926), AFL (1936-37), AAFC (1946-49), AFL (1960-69), WFL (1974-75), USFL (1983-85)

**NFC/AFC since 1970

November 28, 2016

Highlighted Year: Bill Daddio, 1942

End/Placekicker, Chicago Cardinals


Age: 26
2nd season in pro football & with Cardinals
College: Pittsburgh
Height: 5’11” Weight: 204

Prelude:
Daddio was known for his speed at end and placekicking ability in college. He scored a touchdown on a 71-yard interception return in the 1937 Rose Bowl and received some All-American recognition in 1937 and ‘38. Daddio was chosen by the Cardinals in the fifth round of the 1939 NFL draft but spent two seasons as an assistant coach at Pitt before joining the Cards in 1941. He caught five passes for 39 yards as a rookie, intercepted a pass, and kicked four field goals out of eight attempts and 8 of 9 PATs.

1942 Season Summary
Appeared in all 11 games
[Bracketed numbers indicate league rank in Top 20]

Kicking
Field goals – 5 [1]
Most field goals, game – 2 vs. Green Bay 10/4
Field goal attempts – 10 [3]
Field goal percentage – 50.0 [1]
PATs – 8 [9, tied with Dick Erdlitz]
PAT attempts – 8 [9, tied with four others]
Longest field goal – 38 yards vs. Green Bay 10/4, at Pittsburgh 11/22

Pass Receiving
Receptions – 11
Yards – 108
Yards per catch – 9.8
TDs – 1

Interceptions
Interceptions – 1
Int. return yards – 4
Int. TDs – 0

Scoring
TDs – 1
Field Goals – 5
PATs – 8
Points – 29 [18]

Cardinals went 3-8 to finish fourth in the NFL Western Division.

Aftermath:
Daddio spent the next three years in the Navy during World War II and, upon his return to pro football, joined the Buffalo Bisons of the AAFC in 1946 as a player/coach and saw action in three games. Daddio went on to be head coach at Allegheny College from 1947 to ’51 and was a long-time assistant coach and scout at both the college and pro levels.

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Highlighted Years features players who were consensus first-team All-League* selections or league* or conference** leaders in the following statistical categories:

Rushing: Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Passing: Yards, Completion Pct., Yards per Attempt, TDs, Rating
Receiving: Catches, Yards, TDs (min. 10)
Scoring: TDs, Points, Field Goals (min. 5)
All-Purpose: Total Yards
Defense: Interceptions, Sacks
Kickoff Returns: Average
Punt Returns: Average
Punting: Average

*Leagues include NFL (1920 to date), AFL (1926), AFL (1936-37), AAFC (1946-49), AFL (1960-69), WFL (1974-75), USFL (1983-85)

**NFC/AFC since 1970